SearchCap: Target partners with Google, Capture leads with calls & 50M Local Guides

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

From Search Engine Land:

Recent Headlines From Marketing Land, Our Sister Site Dedicated To Internet Marketing:

Search News From Around The Web:

Industry

SEM / Paid Search

SEO


Art for All: Celebrate Diversity in Design—Volume 2

Welcome back to Volume Two of our Diversity in Design series on Envato Tuts+. Discover four talented artists with inspiring styles you’ll love.

4 Artists You Should Know: Diversity in Design

Celebrate the work of these extraordinary artists. Each with their own unique background, they draw inspiration from their culture and surroundings to create phenomenal illustrations.

Shyama Golden

Shyama is an illustrator living in Brooklyn, New York.

From ill rap legends to cat-covered Sasquatches, Shyama’s work is full of charisma and power. See more in her portfolio, or follow her on Twitter @shyamagolden

Biggie

I’m an artist and illustrator with a graphic design education and
background. My parents came to the US from Sri Lanka before I was born
and both worked as scientists, but encouraged me to find my own path.

I
worked as a designer for a decade
before feeling brave enough to switch over to a career in art.

Biggie by Shyama Golden
Biggie

Arundhati Roy

I’m mostly inspired by capturing a feeling of life. My favorite mediums are oil paints, digital
media on the iPad Pro, and I also like to use animation and patterns in my work.

Arundhati Roy by Shyama Golden
Arundhati Roy

Catsquatch

Catsquatch by Shyama Golden
Catsquatch

Maria

I know my
design background influences my work, especially the patterns. I try not to be 100% tied to any
particular art movement or trend that is popular at the moment. I create the things I want to see in the world, or what I feel is missing or
underrated.

Maria by Shyama Golden
Maria

Tavo Montañez

Father, teacher, and jazz lover Tavo Montañez is our second artist from Aguascalientes, Mexico.

His fluid illustrations merge his Mexican cultural influence and creative experimentation. See more in his portfolio, or follow him on Facebook.

Los Amores de Frida

My name is Gustavo Díaz Montañez (Tavo Montañez).

I am an illustrator working mostly in the editorial, publishing, and advertising industries.
My process usually involves drawing
with pencil, ink on paper, and digital coloring.

Los Amores de Frida by Tavo Montanez
Los Amores de Frida {The Loves of Frida)

Perspective Magazine: Time to Act

I’m inspired by nature in general. I love women, animals, textures,
water, and even fiction and monsters. There is a desire within me to always improve my work by finding new mediums and challenges.

Perspective Magazine Time to Act
Perspective Magazine: Time to Act

Los Amores de Frida

Los Amores de Frida
Los Amores de Frida (The Loves of Frida)

10.10

I always turn to the work of my compatriots for inspiration. There’s Saturnino Herrán,
Ernesto García Cabral, and César Moreno among others.

1010
10.10

Catalina Vásquez

Catalina is an animator and illustrator from Medellín, Colombia.

Her delightful illustrations step inside everyday life with bold patterns and textures. See more in her portfolio, or follow her on Instagram.

The Weaver

I’m Catalina Vásquez (Kathiuska) and I started learning illustration on my own during the middle of my audiovisual communication studies. I like to portray everyday life in my illustrations.

I also love moving images, so I’m now working on my second short animated film called, Jail.

The Weaver by Catalina Vasquez
The Weaver

Medellín Brand Campaign

My inspiration is in daily life. I think my work is very autobiographical
and emotional. So I like to go out and see what’s happening around me
and later, process all this information to create my stuff.

Medelln Brand Campaign by Catalina Vasquez
“Expand Your Ideas.” Medellín Brand Campaign

Girl’s Night

Girls Night by Catalina Vasquez
Girl’s Night

Medellín Brand Campaign

I’ve always felt very inspired by the UPA animation studio art style, and American cartoons.

But I also like the concept art
of shows like Mr. Magoo and the Pink Panther for when I need color palettes and inspiration. I love illustrating children’s books, so I’m a fan of artists like Isabel Arsenault, Rebecca Green, and Olga Demidova.

Medelln Brand Campaign by Catalina Vasquez
“Expand Your World.” Medellín Brand Campaign

Eunjoo Lee

Our final artist is Eunjoo Lee. She’s a Korean illustrator and textile designer from Glasgow, Scotland.

Blending her love of art history and Utopian fantasies, Eunjoo creates unique textile illustrations for indoor fabrics and more. See more in her portfolio, or follow her on Instagram.

Utopia

The inspiration behind my illustrations is about the
individualized fantasy of utopia, and how it affects personality. It’s my visual language inspired by the historical art
movement.

Utopia by Eunjoo Lee
Utopia

Korean Fairy Tale Scarf

I try to use a lot of symbols in my artwork because I’m interested in the hidden meanings behind these creative languages.

Korean Fairy Tale Scarf
Korean Fairy Tale Scarf

Haetae

Haetae by Eunjoo Lee
Haetae

Korean Traditional Costume

I’m inspired by a diverse set of visual artists. My textile design
ideas come from Vårklockor Josef Frank, Makoto Kagoshima and historical Asian textile designs.

I also look up to modern artists too, such as Picasso, Miro, Kiki Smiths, and lots of others.

Korean Traditional Costume
Korean Traditional Costume

Celebrate Diversity! Send Us Your Favorite Artists!

Help us find more incredible artists from different backgrounds to share with our audience! Tweet me your recommendations at MelloNieves or use the hashtags #artforall and #tutsplusdesign on Twitter and Instagram. You never know, we may just feature you in our next article!

I’d like to extend a warm thank you to all the artists who participated in
this feature. Feel free to see more of their work in the links below:

SearchCap: ‘Yext for Food’, Google quality score & Local Ads

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

From Search Engine Land:

Recent Headlines From Marketing Land, Our Sister Site Dedicated To Internet Marketing:

Search News From Around The Web:

Industry

SEO

Link Building

Local & Maps


My Journey Of Learning Programming Through Flatiron School #42

My name is Mason Ellwood, and I’m currently working on Flatiron School’s Online Full Stack Web Development Program. Each week, I’ll be writing about my experience, what I’m learning, and tips on learning to code.

So as you all know I finally started learning Javascript! Which is amazing and has helped me out at work immensely. But like all things that you begin to learn for the first time, it becomes a real pain in the butt until you slowly grasp how everything fits together. But I have been amazed at how quickly those pieces are fitting together once I grasped my first OO programming language. How all these pieces fit together and everything is connected in a sense to complete a task.

My time that I have to spend through The Flatiron School so far has taught me to think of things in a different way. How to think of things at a larger scale to complete a task and bring that skill in a tangible form to the workplace.

So for this first lesson, I will give a brief overview of Javascript and we will go through what I have learned together as I am going over it. So you can better understand how I have gone from writing zero Javascript to hopefully being proficient in the language.

As you probably already know, Javascript is the universally accepted language of the internet. As far as a developer standard you should know how to use it.

JavaScript is a dynamic, untyped, and interpreted programming language; it is prototype-based and supports both object-oriented and functional approaches.” – The Flatiron School

If you have never written any Javascript go ahead and open up your console and we will try it out together. To open up the console simple right-click anywhere on this screen and select Inspect. Go to the top of the dialogue box and select Console. This area that you are now it is considered a sandbox. If you are using a mac press Command + K and it will clear the screen for you.

In this sandbox environment, you are now able to write and execute code directly in this environment. If you have been following along in my previous posts this is very similar to the IRB environment. A sandbox if you think of like a sandbox, it is an open area where you can do or make anything you can think of, with some limitations.

Remember how we could play in sandboxes as kids: building castles, moats, and shaping an entire world without worrying about the consequences outside of that world? In programming, sandboxes work the same way: they’re environments that we have complete control over, but whose contents don’t spill into the outside world.)” – The Flatiron School

Inside this Sandbox environment type alert(“Hello World”); And check out the response. You should be given the response below.

This should give you a popup window that prints out the information added to the screen.

Congratulations you have officially written your first lines of Javascript!

A large part of programming is experimentation — we come up with a hypothesis (how we think something should work) and test it with code.” – The Flatiron School

Javascript is a means of completing a task, and with you as the developer thinking about how things should be done without a clear picture to how it should be done. There are endless possibilities to doing the same thing with Javascript, but it is your job as the developer to chose that path.

Try Our New Course in Creative Typography

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Looking to develop your creativity and hone your Photoshop and Illustrator skills with a challenging typographic project? Our new course, Creative Typography, is ideal for you.

What You’ll Learn

In this course, you will learn how to design a piece of concept-driven, typographic artwork. Graphic designer Matt Withers will share practical tips for improving your creative process, demonstrate some techniques for how to create custom lettering in Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, and debunk some myths about creativity along the way.

Watch the Introduction

Take the Course

You can take our new course straight away with a subscription to Envato Elements. For a single low monthly fee, you get access not only to this course, but also to our growing library of over 1,000 video courses and industry-leading eBooks on Envato Tuts+. 

Plus you now get unlimited downloads from the huge Envato Elements library of 320,000+ photos and 36,000+ design assets and templates. Create with unique fonts, photos, graphics and templates, and deliver better projects faster.

SearchCap: Google AdWords interface, Google Home listens & Apple Search Ads expands

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web.

From Search Engine Land:

Recent Headlines From Marketing Land, Our Sister Site Dedicated To Internet Marketing:

Search News From Around The Web:

Industry

Local & Maps

Link Building

Searching

SEO

SEM / Paid Search

Search Marketing


How to Create a Wind Rose Compass Symbol Illustration in Adobe Illustrator

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

In the following steps, you will learn how to create a wind rose compass symbol illustration in Adobe Illustrator. 

For starters, you will learn how to set up a simple grid, how to center shapes, and how to create the main object using a circle and the Appearance panel. Taking full advantage of the Transform effect, you will learn how to easily multiply shapes and how to create a pretty complex compass grid using only a few paths. 

Using a simple blend, the Rotate Tool and some more Transform effects, you will learn how to create the compass needles. Using neat stroke techniques and the Appearance panel, you will learn how to create the background and some tiny details. Finally, using basic blending techniques and several raster effects, you will learn how to add a subtle texture to your final design.

For more inspiration on how to adjust or improve your final illustration, you can find plenty of resources at GraphicRiver.

1. How to Create a New Document and Set Up a Grid

Hit Control-N to create a new document. Select Pixels from the Units drop-down menu, enter 850 in the width and height boxes and then click that More Settings button. Select RGB for the Color Mode, set the Raster Effects to Screen (72 ppi) and then click that Create Document button.

Enable the Grid (View > Show Grid) and the Snap to Grid (View > Snap to Grid). You will need a grid every 5 px, so simply go to Edit > Preferences > Guides & Grid, and enter 5 in the Gridline every box and 1 in the Subdivisions box. Try not to get discouraged by all that grid—it will make your work easier, and keep in mind that you can easily enable or disable it using the Control-“ keyboard shortcut.

You can learn more about Illustrator’s grid system in this short tutorial from Andrei Stefan: Understanding Adobe Illustrator’s Grid System.

You should also open the Info panel (Window > Info) for a live preview with the size and position of your shapes. Don’t forget to set the unit of measurement to pixels from Edit > Preferences > Units. All these options will significantly increase your work speed.

setup grid

2. How to Create the Main Circle

Step 1

Pick the Ellipse Tool (L) and focus on your Toolbar. Remove the color from the stroke and then select the fill and set its color to R=226 G=228 B=243. Move to your artboard and simply create a 440 px circle—the grid and the Snap to Grid should make this easier.

Next, you need to center your shape. Open the Align panel (Window > Align) and set the alignment to artboard. If you can’t see that Align To section, open the fly-out menu from the Align panel and go to Show Options. Make sure that your circle is still selected and then click the Horizontal Align Center and Vertical Align Center buttons. This should bring your circle to the center of the artboard, as shown in the following image.

circle

Step 2

Make sure that your circle stays selected and open the Appearance panel (Window > Appearance). Add a second fill using the Add New Fill button and then select it.

Set the color to R=246 G=248 B=255 and then go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -5 px Offset and then click that OK button.

add new fill

Step 3

Make sure that your circle stays selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a third fill and select it. Set the color to R=226 G=228 B=243 and then go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -15 px Offset and then click that OK button.

Keep focusing on the Appearance panel and add the other three fills shown in the following image. Use the color and offset attributes indicated below.

add new fill

Step 4

Make sure that your circle is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Select the stroke, set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61 and increase the Weight to 4 px.

stroke

Step 5

Make sure that your circle is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a second stroke using the Add New Stroke button, select it and go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -5 px Offset and then click that OK button.

add new stroke

Step 6

Make sure that your circle is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a third stroke, select it and go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -15 px Offset and then click that OK button.

Keep focusing on the Appearance panel and add the other three strokes shown in the following image. Use the color and offset attributes indicated below. In the end things should look like in the following image.

strokes

Step 7

Make sure that your circle is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a new fill, drag it to the bottom of the panel, and select it.

Set the color to R=28 G=35 B=61, lower its Opacity to 20% and then go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -20 px Offset, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Vertical slider to -45 px, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Enter a 15 px Radius and then click that OK button.

gaussian blur

3. How to Create the Compass Grids

Step 1

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 15 x 10 px shape, fill it with R=28 G=35 B=61 and place it exactly as shown in the first image. Keep focusing on this tiny rectangle and switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A). Select the top anchor points and simply drag them 25 px to the right. In the end things should look like in the second image.

direct selection tool

Step 2

Make sure that your tiny, dark shape is still selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Drag the Move-Vertical slider to 220 px, enter 1 in that Copies box, and then click that OK button.

transform

Step 3

Make sure that your tiny, dark shape is still selected and go again to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter 11 in that Copies box, set the Angle to 15 degrees, and then click that OK button.

transform

Step 4

Using the Pen Tool (P) or the Line Tool (\), create a 20 px vertical path and place it exactly as shown in the following image. Add a 2 px stroke for this path and set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61.

pen tool

Step 5

Make sure that your vertical path stays selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown in the left window (in the following image), click that OK button, and then go again to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown in the right window and then click that OK button.

transform

Step 6

Using the Pen Tool (P) or the Line Tool (\), create a 40 px vertical path and place it exactly as shown in the following image. Add a 4 px stroke for this path, set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61, and then click that Stroke piece of text to open the Stroke fly-out panel. Move to the Profile section and select Width Profile 4 from that list.

width profile

Step 7

Make sure that your vertical path stays selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown in the left window (make sure that you check the Reflect Y box), click that OK button, and then go again to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown in the right window and then click that OK button.

transform

Step 8

Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 20 px circle and place it as shown in the first image. Fill this new shape with R=226 G=228 B=243 and add a 4 px stroke. Align it to inside and set the color to R=28 G=35 B=61.

Keep focusing on this circle, pick the Anchor Point Tool (Shift-C), and simply click the four anchor points that make up your shape. This will basically turn your circle into a diamond.

diamond

Step 9

Make sure that your diamond shape is still selected and apply the two Transform effects shown in the following image.

multiply

4. How to Create the Background

Step 1

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 790 px square and fill it with R=246 G=248 B=255. Send this new shape to back (Shift-Control-[) and center it using the same commands from the Align panel.

rectangle

Step 2

Make sure that your square stays selected and focus on the Appearance panel. Add a second fill, drag it to the bottom of the panel, and select it. Set the color to R=28 G=35 B=61 and then go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a 35 px Offset and then click that OK button.

background

Step 3

Make sure that your square is still selected and focus on the Appearance panel. Select the top fill and go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 95 px Radius, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a 10 px Offset and then click that OK button.

rounded corners

Step 4

Make sure that your square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Select the stroke and set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61 and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 95 px Radius, click that OK button, and return to the Appearance panel. Open the Stroke fly-out panel, set the Weight to 10 px, and check that Dashed Line box. Enter 4 px in the first dash and gap boxes, and don’t forget to check that Aligns dashes to corners and path ends… button.

dashed line

Step 5

Make sure that your square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a second stroke and select it. Set the color to R=28 G=35 B=61 and go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -5 px Offset, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 90 px Radius, click that OK button, and return to the Appearance panel. Open the Stroke fly-out menu for this new stroke, set the Weight to 5 px, and don’t forget to check the Align Stroke to Inside button.

add new stroke

Step 6

Make sure that your square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Select the top stroke and duplicate it using the Duplicate Selected Item button. Focus on the new stroke and simply click the existing Offset Path effect to open it. Replace the -5 px Offset with a 5 px Offset and then click that OK button. Also, open the existing Rounded Corners effect and increase the Radius to 100 px.

add new stroke

5. How to Create the Compass Needles

Step 1

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 70 x 55 px shape and place it exactly as shown in the first image. Fill this new shape with R=226 G=228 B=243 and add a 4 px stroke. Align it to inside and set the color to R=28 G=35 B=61.

Make sure that your rectangle is still selected and go to Object > Path > Add Anchor Points. Pick the Delete Anchor Point Tool (-) and simply click the four anchor points highlighted in the first image to remove them. Switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A), select the top-middle anchor point, and drag it 195 px up. In the end, your shape should look like in the second image.

add anchor points

Step 2

Using the Line Tool (\), create a 225 px vertical path and place it as shown in the following image. Add a 4 px stroke for this path and set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61.

line tool

Step 3

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 30 x 5 px shape, fill it with a random yellow, and place it as shown in the first image. Keep focusing on this new rectangle and switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A). Select the right anchor points and drag them 45 px up.

Reselect the Rectangle Tool (M), create a 5 px square, fill it with a random yellow, and place it as shown in the third image. Switch to the Direct Selection Tool (A), select the right anchor points, and drag them 10 px up. In the end things should look like in the fifth image.

yellow rectangle

Step 4

Focus on your Toolbar and simply double click the Blend Tool to open the Blend Options window. Select Specified Steps from the Spacing drop-down menu and enter 18 in that box. Reselect your yellow shapes, replace that fill color with R=28 G=35 B=61 and then hit Alt-Control-B to create a new blend. In the end, things should look like in the second image.

blend tool

Step 5

Select your blend along with the other two shapes that make up your compass needle and Group them (Control-G). Make sure that your group is selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Set the Angle to 90 degrees and enter 3 in that Copies box. Don’t forget to check that middle-bottom reference point, and then click that OK button.

group

Step 6

Using the Pen Tool (P) , create a simple path as shown in the first image and fill it with R=246 G=248 B=255. Add a copy of this shape in the same place (Control-C > Control-F) and select it. Replace the existing fill color with R=28 G=35 B=61 and then pick the Delete Anchor Point Tool (-) and remove the anchor point highlighted in the second image.

Reselect the first shape made in this step and add a 4 px stroke. Align it to outside and set the color to R=28 G=35 B=61. Select both shapes made in this step and Group them (Control-G).

delete anchor point

Step 7

Make sure that the group made in the previous step is still selected and pick the Rotate Tool (R). Hold the Alt key from your keyboard, click exactly on the bottom anchor point to set the center point in that spot, and the Rotate window will open. Set the Angle to -90 degrees and then click that OK button. Be sure that your newly made group remains selected and simply hit Control-D twice. In the end, things should look like in the third image.

center point

Step 8

Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 170 px circle and place it as shown in the first image. Fill this new shape with R=28 G=35 B=61, lower its Opacity to 60% and then go to Effect > Blur > Gaussian Blur. Enter a 15 px Radius and then click that OK button. Make sure that this blurred shape stays selected and send it behind the needles using the Control-[ keyboard shortcut.

gaussian blur

6. How to Create the Compass Center

Step 1

Pick the Ellipse Tool (L) and create a 90 px circle. Fill it with R=226 G=228 B=243 and center it. Add a 4 px stroke and set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61. Duplicate the stroke, select the copy, and go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -20 px Offset and then click that OK button.

circle

Step 2

Using the Ellipse Tool (L), create a 40 px circle and center it. Add a 2 px stroke for this new shape, set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61 and then open that Stroke fly-out panel. Focus on the Profile section and select Width Profile 1. Make three copies of this circle (Control-C > Control-F) and squeeze them gradually as shown in the following image: 30 px, 20 px and 10 px.

width profile

Step 3

Using the Pen Tool (P) or the Line Tool (\), create a 10 px vertical path and place it exactly as shown in the following image. Add a 2 px stroke for this path, set its color to R=28 G=35 B=61 and then open the Stroke fly-out panel. Check the Round Cap button and then move to the Profile section and select Width Profile 4 from that list.

Make sure that your tiny path is still selected and go to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown in the following image (make sure that you check the Reflect Y box) and then click that OK button.

round cap

Step 4

Make sure that your tiny path is still selected and go to again to Effect > Distort & Transform > Transform. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and then click that OK button.

transform

7. How to Add the Text

Step 1

Pick the Type Tool (T) and open the Character panel (Window > Type > Character). Select the Milkshake font and set the size to 50 px. Simply click on your artboard and type the text. Add the four letters shown in the following image and set their color to R=28 G=35 B=61.

type tool

Step 2

Make sure that the Type Tool (T) is still active, return to the Character panel, and set the size to 30 px. Add the other four pieces of text shown in the following image and use the same color.

character panel

8. How to Add a Grungy Texture

Step 1

Using the Rectangle Tool (M), create an 810 px square and center it. Fill this new shape with R=229 G=207 B=170 and focus on the Appearance panel.

Select the fill, lower its Opacity to 50%, change the Blending Mode to Soft Light, and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 110 px Radius, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Sketch > Note Paper. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and then click that OK button.

note paper

Step 2

Make sure that your 810 px square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a second fill and select it.

Set the color to R=67 G=43 B=15, lower its Opacity to 50%, change the Blending Mode to Color Burn, and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 105 px Radius, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Path > Offset Path. Enter a -6 px Offset, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Sketch > Note Paper. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and then click that OK button.

note paper

Step 3

Make sure that your 810 px square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a third fill and select it.

Set the color to black (R=0 G=0 B=0), lower its Opacity to 50% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 110 px Radius, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Artistic > Film Grain. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and then click that OK button.

film grain

Step 4

Make sure that your 810 px square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add a fourth fill and select it.

Set the color to black, lower its Opacity to 50% and change the Blending Mode to Soft Light and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 110 px Radius, click that OK button, and then go to Effect > Sketch > Graphic Pen. Enter the attributes shown in the following image and then click that OK button.

graphic pen

Step 5

Make sure that your 810 px square is still selected and keep focusing on the Appearance panel. Add one final fill and select it.

Replace the color with the linear gradient shown in the following image, change the Blending Mode to Color and then go to Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners. Enter a 110 px Radius and then click that OK button. Keep in mind that the yellow zero from the Gradient image stands for Opacity percentage.

linear gradient

Congratulations! You’re Done!

Here is how it should look. I hope you’ve enjoyed this tutorial and can apply these techniques in your future projects. Don’t hesitate to share your final result in the comments section.

Feel free to adjust the final design and make it your own. You can find some great sources of inspiration at GraphicRiver, with interesting solutions to improve your design.

final product

Faster & smarter: Moving from manual to automated SEM campaign management

Automating SEM campaigns is a smart move, thanks to the benefits you reap from eliminating drudge work, but also from the reductions in potential execution errors. Google has consistently built new tools that help with automation, and has recently beefed up capabilities within AdWords.

As Frederick Vallaeys recently wrote on Search Engine Land, AdWords Scripts are now available in the new AdWords interface, giving users a visual refresh, as well as some new capabilities that make management a bit easier, especially for advertisers with lots of scripts in their accounts.

With the new additions, you can see up to 500 script logs per page and filter by date, see a more precise time when a script will run, see who added a script to the account, filter scripts based on name or who created it and much more.

Want to learn more about automating your SEM campaigns? At SMX East, start with the all-new session, “Faster & smarter: Moving from manual to automated SEM campaign managements.” In this session, you’ll learn tactics, strategies and tools to move from manual to automated management of repetitive tasks. You’ll also be treated to a glimpse of new artificial intelligence (AI) tools that promise to radically change how we all manage our campaigns.

Then, in “Must-Have Reports For Search Advertisers,” our SEM experts share their own favorite reports that help them maximize returns and gain an edge on the competition. You’ll learn how to set up the reports and how often to use them to delight and satisfy clients, bosses and other key stakeholders.

Dig even deeper into using data and analytics to drive your decision-making during the “SEM Analytics: Giving Your Educated Guesses An Advanced Degree” session. In this session, speakers will:

  • identify tactics for making better decisions from messy, complex data.
  • generate better analytics data by deciding what’s important and relevant.
  • discuss how to work around data imperfections, blind spots and ambiguities.
  • show how to glean actionable insights from your data and analytics.
  • generate reports that demonstrate your findings with crystal clarity.

In the classroom track, you’ll also want to hear from representatives from Google, Bing and Amazon during the sessions “Turning More Clicks into Conversions with Google Optimize,” “The Art and Science of Bing Ads Automation” and “Advertising On Amazon: Reach And Engage A Qualified Audience.”

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How to Create a Sketch vs. Camera Effect in Adobe Photoshop

Final product image
What You’ll Be Creating

Ben Heine is a Belgian visual artist and music producer born in 1983 in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, currently living and working in Brussels, Belgium. 

He is best known for his original series “Pencil Vs Camera”, “Digital Circlism” and “Flesh and Acrylic”. He is a self-taught person in drawing, photography, and music.

Pencil Vs Camera is an original visual concept invented and popularized by Ben Heine since April 2010. The images in this series usually show a surreal hand-drawn sketch held by the artist and placed over a real photograph to symbolize the connection between reality and imagination/creativity. 

Pencil Sketch vs. Camera Photoshop Action

This effect is part of the Pencil Sketch vs. Camera Photoshop action that you can download from Envato Market.

Pencil Sketch vs Camera Photoshop Action
Pencil Sketch vs. Camera Photoshop Action

Tutorial Assets

The following assets were used during the production of this tutorial:

1. Add the Girls Photo

Create an 850 x 636 px New Document. You can, of course, use another size for your PSD file, but you have to proportionally adjust all the sizes used in this tutorial. Add the Girls stock image.

Girls stock image

2. Add the Torn Paper

Step 1

I have attached a Torn Paper PNG image that you can use. But, if you want to create your own texture of a torn paper, it’s very easy to do. You can find a piece of thick paper or cardboard and tear it roughly in the shape that you want. Then place it on a flat surface, preferably of a contrasting color (e.g. black if the paper is white). 

Take a photo using a camera or a mobile phone. Make sure that you take the picture from directly above the piece of paper so that the perspective matches what we need.

Take a Torn Paper Photo

Step 2

Upload the photo to your computer and open it in Photoshop. Using the Magic Wand Tool, make a selection and remove the background.

Remove Background in Photoshop

Step 3

Download the Torn Paper PNG image and add it in a new layer.

Add Torn Paper

Step 4

Press Control-T to rotate the Torn Paper and position it over the area that you want to turn into a sketch. 

Rotate Layer in Photoshop

Step 5

Press Control-J twice, to make two copies of the Torn Paper layer, and call them Torn Paper 1 layer and Torn Paper 2 layer.

Duplicate Layers in Photoshop

Step 6

Add a Drop Shadow layer style to the Torn Paper layer, using the color #000000.

Add Drop Shadow in Photoshop

3. Make Four Copies for the Girls Layer

Step 1

Press Control-J four times, to make four copies of the Girls layer, and call them Girls 1 layer, Girls 2 layer, Girls 3 layer, and Girls 4 layer. 

Duplicate Layers in Photoshop

Step 2

Keep the Control key pressed and select Girls 1 layer, Girls 2 layer, Girls 3 layer, and Girls 4 layer. Move them above the Torn paper layer.

Move Layers in Photoshop

4. Use the Graphic Pen and Motion Blur Filters in Photoshop

Step 1

Hide all the copy layers except the Girls 1 layer. 

Set the Foreground Color to #000000 and the Background Color to #ffffff

Step 2

For the Girls 1 layer, go to Filter > Sketch > Graphic Pen. For another image, you might have to adjust these settings.

Graphic Pen Photoshop Filter

Step 3

Go to Filter > Blur > Motion Blur.

Motion Blur Photoshop Filter

5. Use the Graphic Pen and Noise Filters in Photoshop

Step 1

Make the Girls 2 layer visible and set the blend mode to Multiply, opacity 30%. 

Step 2

Go to Filter > Sketch > Graphic Pen. For another image, you might have to adjust these settings.

Graphic Pen Photoshop Filter

Step 3

Go to Filter > Noise > Add Noise.

Add Noise Photoshop Filter

6. Use the Photocopy Filter in Photoshop

Step 1

Make the Girls 3 layer visible and set the blend mode to Multiply, opacity 100%. 

Step 2

Go to Filter > Sketch > Photocopy.

Photocopy Photoshop Filter

7. Use the Watercolor Filter in Photoshop

Step 1

Make the Girls 4 layer visible and set the blend mode to Color, opacity 100%. 

Step 2

Go to Filter > Artistic > Watercolor. You can hide the Girls 4 layer for now.

Watercolor Photoshop Filter

8. Create the Sketch Paper Piece With a Clipping Mask 

Keep the Control key pressed and select the Girls 1 layer, Girls 2 layer, Girls 3 layer, and Girls 4 layer. Right click on the selected layers and choose Create Clipping Mask.

Create Clipping Mask in Photoshop
Sketch Paper Piece in Photoshop

9. Create the Torn Paper Border

Step 1

Make the Torn Paper 1 layer visible and set the blend mode to Multiply, opacity 57%.

Create Paper Effect in Photoshop

Step 2

Make the Torn Paper 2 layer visible. Click on the Add Layer Mask button from the Layers tab to add a mask for the Torn Paper 2 layer.

Step 3

Create a new layer just below the Torn Paper 2 layer and fill it with color #ffffff

Fill Layer with Color

Step 4

Click on the Torn Paper 2 layer mask thumbnail. Go to Image > Apply Image

Apply Image in Photoshop

Step 5

Go to Image > Adjustments > Levels and enter these settings.

Levels Adjustment in Photoshop

You can use the Brush Tool and paint with color #ffffff inside the Torn Paper 2 layer if you want to add a more ripped edge effect.

Step 6

Delete the White Background layer to see the effect. 

Torn Paper Effect in Photoshop

Step 7

Keep the Control key pressed and select the Torn Paper 1 layer and the Torn Paper 2 layer. Right click on the selected layers and choose Create Clipping Mask.

Create Clipping Mask in Photoshop

10. Move the Sketch Effect Very Easily

If you want another part of your image to be turned into a sketch, simply keep the Control key pressed and select the Torn Paper 1 layer, the Torn Paper 2 layer, and the Torn Paper layer. 

Use the Move Tool to change the position of the torn paper piece.

Use the Move Tool in Photoshop

Congratulations! You’re Done!

In this tutorial, you’ve learned how to create a Sketch vs. Camera effect in Photoshop using your photos, in just a few steps.

Sketch vs Camera Photoshop Tutorial

This effect is part of the Pencil Sketch vs. Camera Photoshop action that you can download from Envato Market.

Pencil Sketch vs Camera Photoshop Action
Pencil Sketch vs. Camera Photoshop Action

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